Homemade Raw Milk Ice Cream Bases

Share on Facebook550Pin on Pinterest2.1kTweet about this on TwitterShare on Google+8Share on LinkedIn0Share on Reddit0Digg thisShare on StumbleUpon0Share on Tumblr0
Print Friendly
Quick, easy, and exceptionally creamy recipes for vanilla and chocolate homemade raw milk ice cream bases. Giving recipes for both vanilla and chocolate makes it possible for you to adapt them to many, many different flavors. Customize them with your own delicious add-ins, if you like!

Homemade vanilla and chocolate raw milk ice cream

Last week I finally got ahold of some raw milk. I was warned that it tastes “strong” in comparison to pasteurized milk, but I found it sweet, mild, and delicious. Despite the fact that I had skimmed off the cream, the milk tasted as rich as supermarket “whole milk” And “rich” is exactly right for home made ice cream, my plan all along for this farm fresh milk and cream. Aside from the fresh, creamy deliciousness, the best thing about these raw milk ice cream bases is their simplicity. Just blend the ingredients and let the ice cream maker do the rest.

About the ingredients

Raw milk

Why raw milk? Glad you asked! I was curious about it, it happened to be available, and I’d heard claims of health benefits, though I hadn’t yet read up on the pros and cons. Also, I tend to think that warnings about food borne illness go a bit over the top when the risk is actually quite low.

But, by now, I have read up on it. There is an excellent 2014 article reviewing the actual studies on the risks and benefits of raw vs. pasteurized milk – see the Sources section at the end of this post. It was interesting to learn that some studies suggest reduced allergies in rural children who consume raw milk, but the reviewers wisely caution that urban children, who usually have little or no direct contact with farm animals, might have a different immunological response to raw milk consumption. Without further studies showing benefits in urban and suburban populations, it doesn’t seem wise to recommend raw milk in general.

As for nutritional value, vitamins B12, B2, and E are all significantly reduced in pasteurized milk, but the reviewers remind us that even raw milk is not an important source of B12 or E, and B2 can be found in many other common foods. So, all of this weighed against the real and significant risk of food borne illness? Maybe for rural children, but not in general, at least not unless future studies show reduced allergies in other children. At this point I personally am not committed to consuming raw dairy products on a daily basis, but I’m willing to take the risk every now and then. Do your own research and make your own decision.

By the way, you might need up to a full gallon of milk to get the 2 cups of cream needed for this recipe. Let the milk sit in the refrigerator for at least 24 hours, to allow the cream time to rise to the top. Some people give it 2-3 days, but you’ll get most of the cream after just 24 hours. If you want to use pasteurized milk and cream for these recipes, use heavy cream and whole milk.

Raw eggs

You will notice that these ice cream bases also contain raw egg. I’ve been eating gobs of raw egg containing cookie dough for almost 50 years, with nary a problem, so I figure a little raw egg in a scoop of ice cream is nothing new to my diet. As for possible health benefits of raw over cooked eggs, you might see claims of substantially higher levels of vitamin D, omega-3 fats, etc., but according to the USDA National Nutrient Database, the differences are modest. See the links to that site in the Sources section at the end of this article.  So I wouldn’t recommend consumption of raw eggs on a regular basis, but an occasional scoop of ice cream with a small amount of raw egg works for me. Make your own decision.

If you want an egg free ice cream, you may substitute the egg with an additional 1/4 cup of whole milk, as indicated in the recipes. I prefer to use the egg because it slightly improves the flavor and mouth feel of the ice cream. But in winter when the hens lay fewer eggs, I often make egg free ice cream.

Cocoa

As always, I will warn that the flavor of a chocolate treat is no better than that of the chocolate or cocoa you use. The flavor of cocoa, in particular, varies enormously from brand to brand, so be sure to use one that you know you like. If you don’t like the flavor of the cocoa you use, you won’t like the ice cream. For this chocolate ice cream, I like to use 1-2 tbsp of Omanhene natural cocoa, and 2-3 tbsp of Valrhona Dutch process cocoa.

About The Technique

Raw ice cream, with or without eggs, often has a gritty, icy texture, but you’ll find that these recipes produce a smooth and creamy ice cream. The egg helps, and the small volume is even more important. Most recipes for standard 1.5 quart ice cream makers call for a larger volume base, but a smaller volume freezes faster. And faster freezing discourages the formation of gritty crystals. If you have a 2 quart ice cream maker, don’t double these recipes. A 1x or 1.5x recipe in a 2 quart ice cream maker will yield a very smooth ice cream, but a 2x recipe is likely to give you some grit.

If you prefer a custard style vanilla ice cream, use my chai spiced vanilla ice cream recipe, omitting the cardamom and cinnamon. Custard has a distinct flavor, which is quite noticeable in custard style vanilla ice cream. It will taste different from raw vanilla ice cream. Chocolate largely masks the custard flavor, and if you want the absolute ultimate in mouth feel, see this custard style chocolate ice cream.  To minimize changes due to cooking the milk, cook the custard on low heat. It will take longer, but thickening will occur at a lower temperature, sometimes as low as 160 degrees F. A temperature of 180 degrees F would kill most of the potentially probiotic bacteria. Notice I said “potentially probiotic”. Whether or not raw milk contains probiotic bacteria is the subject of a debate which goes beyond this post.

Quick, easy, and exceptionally creamy recipes for vanilla and chocolate homemade raw milk ice cream bases. Giving recipes for both vanilla and chocolate makes it possible for you to adapt them to many, many different flavors. Customize them with your own delicious add-ins, if you like!

Follow directions exactly, and you’ll find that these homemade raw ice creams are never gritty.

Homemade Raw Milk Ice Cream Bases

Some will contend that only custard style or cornstarch thickened ice creams are “the real thing”, but I say that’s nonsense. There’s no “real” or “right” way to make ice cream. If you like it, it’s real and it’s right. Period. I used a raw base here rather than a custard (which I also love) because cooking would diminish some of the presumed benefits of raw milk, which would defeat the purpose of buying it.

Vanilla raw milk ice cream base

The egg, milk, and cream should be at refrigerator temperature before beginning, because you want the base cold when you put it in the ice cream maker.

Makes 1 quart

  • 1 large to extra large egg (or an extra 1/4 cup of whole milk)
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tbsp sugar
  • Beans of 1 vanilla bean pod (optional)
  • 2 cups raw cream (heavy cream if using pasteurized cream)
  • 3/4 cup raw milk (whole or 2% if using pasteurized milk)
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the egg until yolk and white are well blended.
  2. Whisk in the sugar.
  3. If using the vanilla bean, slit the vanilla bean pod lengthwise, scrape the tiny black beans into the egg mixture, and whisk to blend. Save the pod for another use. (The pod can be steeped in hot milk or cream to flavor a custard, for example.)
  4. Add the cream, milk, and vanilla extract to the egg mixture, and whisk to blend.
  5. Pour into a 1.5 quart ice cream maker, and churn according to manufacturer’s directions.
  6. Transfer to a quart size freezer container. Eat as soft serve, or freeze for several hours for scoopable ice cream.

Chocolate Raw Milk Ice Cream

Makes 1 quart

The egg, milk, and cream should be at refrigerator temperature when you start. Be sure to whisk the cocoa with the sugar as directed because it blend better with the liquid ingredients. If the cocoa is added directly to the liquid ingredients, it will be difficult to blend it.

  • 1 large to extra large egg (or an extra 1/4 cup of whole milk)
  • 1/2 cup raw milk (whole or 2% if using pasteurized milk)
  • 2 cups cream (heavy cream if using pasteurized cream)
  • 1/2 cup plus 1 tbsp sugar
  • Pinch of salt
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened cocoa
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  1. In a large mixing bowl, whisk the egg until yolk and white are well blended. Whisk in the milk and about a cup of the cream, and set aside.
  2. In a small bowl, whisk together the sugar, cocoa, and salt until mixture is free of lumps.
  3. Add the cocoa mix to the medium bowl containing the milk and some of the cream, and whisk until well blended.
  4. Add the vanilla and the rest of the cream to the large bowl, and whisk until well blended.
  5. Transfer to a 1.5 quart ice cream maker, and churn according to manufacturer’s directions.
  6. Transfer to a quart size freezer container. Eat as soft serve, or freeze for several hours for scoopable ice cream.

Variations

You can use these recipes as bases for many different flavors. Add 1/2 to 3/4 cups of chocolate chips, crumbled cookies, small chunks of raw cookie dough, etc. Substitute mint or other extract for the vanilla. Substitute some of the sugar with honey, maple syrup, molasses, or brown sugar.

Sources:

  1. Davis, B. J. K. et al. 2014. A literature review of the risks and benefits of consuming raw and pasteurized cow’s milk. Johns Hopkins Center for a Livable Future, Johns Hopkins University.
  2. USDA National Nutrient Database, Basic Report: 01128, Egg, whole, cooked, fried
  3. USDA National Nutrient Database, Basic Report: 01123, Egg, whole, raw, fresh
Quick, easy, and exceptionally creamy recipes for vanilla and chocolate homemade raw milk ice cream bases. Giving recipes for both vanilla and chocolate makes it possible for you to adapt them to many, many different flavors. Customize them with your own delicious add-ins, if you like!

Please pin THIS image.


Comments

Homemade Raw Milk Ice Cream Bases — 18 Comments

  1. Hello, i was wondering if you have tried recipe with more raw milk versus heavy cream. I have dexters that don’t give a lot of cream ( or only to baby) would like your take on this. Hate to ruin a a good batch. But then again , can it be ruined?

    • Hi Donna, I’m not familiar with the milk of Dexter cows in particular, so I don’t know how well it would work. A raw base relies on the fat content for richness and smoothness. If you made it with more milk or with all milk, the mouth feel wouldn’t be as good. Not that it would be bad – it really depends on how you like your ice cream; how picky you are about texture and richness. Try it and see if you like it. If it’s not smooth enough for your liking, you could try adding to the next batch, 1-2 tbsp of vodka and/or tapioca syrup (corn syrup works, too), both of which help smooth the texture, and prevent it from freezing rock solid, which lowfat ice creams tend to do. Good luck!

    • I know I am behind on this, but I have Dexters also, and get lots of cream, more so when the calf has been weaned. The other thing is, the less grain and more forage (grass and hay/alfalfa) the more cream you get. I give only a small amount of grain, and get about 1/2 cup cream per 1/2gal.
      Totally looking forward to trying this recipe.

  2. Pingback: A Time to Keep: July 2015

  3. Hi! I just got a gallon of raw! Do I really have to use cream? What would happen if I just used that (instead of milk and 2 c cream)? I’m so lazy! 🙂

  4. I’m trying to do an all-raw ice cream. Can you substitute all the sugar for raw honey? If so, would that be an equal amount of honey for the sugar?

  5. I wondered if I could use maple syrup instead of white sugar in the recipe. Or half of each? Do you think it would be smoother with maple syrup or sugar?

    • Maple syrup does make it a little grittier, but it’s still a very good ice cream. I usually prefer to make a custard based maple ice cream, and have a recipe for it. You can find it in the post index (see tab at top of page) if interested.

  6. When I make raw milk ice cream with my machine I get bits of butter that form in it. Does yours ever do this? Any ideas on how to over come this problem?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *